Kensington Astronomy at the Beach {09/09-10/16}

There is no admission fee to attend but a Metropark vehicle pass is required. If you don’t have a yearly pass, a daily vehicle pass can be purchased at the gate for just $7. The event takes place at Maple Beach inside Kensington Metropark. Food and beverages can be purchased at the Metropark concession stand. Seating outside may be limited, so consider bringing chairs.

Schedule of activities:

  • 6 pm to Sunset: View sunspots, prominences, and other features of the sun throughsafe white-light and incredible hydrogen-alpha solar telescopes.
  • 6:20 pm to 10 pm  (every 20 minutes): Visit the Michigan Science Center’s portable planetarium for a tour of the constellations and current evening sky.
  • 6:15 pm: Learn about the celestial visitors we call comets. Watch a “comet” be made from dry ice and common household ingredients. Very family friendly.
  • 6:45 pm: Kids can become the constellations in the “Rescue of Andromeda”impromptu play.
  • 7:30 pm: Oh What a Spin We’re In! From galaxies to planets to tornadoes, there’s a lot of spinning going on out there. Find out more about the space environment with liquid nitrogen and everyday common objects, participate in some angular momentum demonstrations, and watch a “fire tornado” come to life!
  • 8:15 pm: Losing the Dark: Why can’t you see many stars from your neighborhood? Learn about how light pollution is making it harder to see stars and other astronomical objects, and what you can do to help reverse the trend.
  • 8:40 pm: 3D tour of the Solar System: Take a short 3D movie tour through our Solar System. This presentation uses the red-blue 3D glasses, please arrive a little early to get your glasses.
  • 9 pm: KEYNOTE: The Great American Total Eclipse of 2017
    On August 21, 2017, a total eclipse of the Sun will be visible from the contiguous United States for the first time since 1979. The track of the Moon’s shadow cuts diagonally across the nation from Oregon to South Carolina. Inside the 68-mile-wide path of totality, the Moon will completely cover the Sun as the landscape is plunged into an eerie twilight, and the Sun’s glorious corona is revealed for over 2 minutes.
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